Eagerly Awaiting : Raavan

Indian actor Abhishek Bachchan with wife/actre...Image via Wikipedia

The Mani Ratnam directed multi-lingual magnum opus - Raavan is one of the most eagerly awaited films. The secrecy surrounding the film as well as a few controversies have kept it in the news. The trailer is out prior to the music release (2h April 2010). The trailer is impressive. Abhishek Bachchan looks to have some solid screen presence (let us not forget that it was Mani Ratnam who resurrected his career with Yuva ). The film also stars Aishwarya Rai Bachchan, Vikram, Govinda, Ravi Kishan, Priyamani among many others.

The trailer is available for viewing at the below links. Watch the trailer and be impressed.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y4e2O-JaIl8

http://www.raavan-thefilm.com/


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The Japanese Wife

Padamaja Nagarur gives you her take on Kunal Basu's latest.

The Japanese Wife….by Kunal Basu……and I pulled the book off the shelf. The cover had a picture of Chigasu Takaku (didn’t know it was her then) and a quote by Aparna Sen about how improbable and hauntingly beautiful the love story was…and how she immediately decided to make it a film. I couldn't’t resist and moments later I was back home…impatient to start the story….She sent him kites.

Short story that it was…I didn't take much time to get to the climax but it was hard to believe the silence I was observing long after I finished reading. That was when my wait for the movie began…I was glad to see a dedicated page on Facebook for the movie; read/saw every possible interview/article/video which made my patience worthwhile. Unfortunately there were not too many who shared my love for The Japanese Wife (TJW)…probably one did (my husband)...forcibly. Marriage does force you to commit yourself to your partner’s interests and so I dragged him along to TJW on the day it released. He couldn't’t help but acknowledge my unhesitating grin and sat along with me in the barely filled movie hall.

“Dear Snehamoy, I was waiting for your letter. Yes, I shall be your penfriend. The meaning of my name is ‘gift‘. – Miyage” in the beautiful voice of Chigasu Takaku followed by Snehamoy’s response in a heavily Bengali accented Rahul Bose’s voice and the backdrop of the enchanting Sunderbans – that was how the “hauntingly” beautiful love story began to unfold.

A Mathematics teacher in a village of Sunderbans, Snehamoy Chatterjee (Rahul Bose), finds a pen pal in Miyage (Chigasu Takaku) through a magazine. Loners that both are, they find a soothing companionship in each other and share stories of their lives, rivers and more. After several years of letters, Miyage offers herself as a bride to him. After considerable deliberation, Snehamoy accepts her proposal but cannot get himself to disclose this to his garrulous aunt (Moushmi Chatterjee) who finds it hard to believe that he’s married to a Japani.

While the husband and wife continue to share unconditioned love for each other through letters, Snehamoy involuntarily welcomes a complication in his life in the form of a widow Sandhya (Raima Sen). Unknowingly, he finds himself getting used to the presence of the mother and her son. And the Japanese kites that Miyage gifts him for their 15th anniversary develops a special bond between the kid and Kaku (in an Indo-Japanese kite competition or so the locals assume). But soon he withdraws himself into a cocoon when he receives a letter from Miyage about her ill-health. And the complication heightens when his aunt asks him to accompany Sandhya to a nearby town to pawn her gold to pay for her son’s thread ceremony. He experiences a strange comfort in the company of this woman while he follows her through the town making odd-little purchases.

This story could have been just another who-do-I-choose-finally love story but what makes this one unusual is its believable innocence even in this fast paced world of LSD….thanks to Ms. Sen. (Scenes where Snehamoy’s amused by Bipasha Basu’s Beedi Jalaile makes you wonder about the parallel worlds which still exist today).

Having said all this, I still agree with Anupama Chopra that The Japanese Wife is an acquired taste and you can appreciate it only if you are generously patient.

Rating: 3.5/5

Originally published by Padmaja Nagarur on Paddytalkies

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